Super Tuesday | Associated Press

Super Tuesday

  • LATE-NIGHT ANALYSIS: The fight will go on

    This contest will continue regardless of the final outcomes of Super Tuesday.

    Rick Santorum made sure of that. He won at least three states and solidified his standing that he's the chief alternative to Romney despite a four-state losing streak.

    Newt Gingrich won his former home-state of Georgia, giving himself fresh justification for continuing his beleaguered bid.

    And it's a certainty that Mitt Romney's in this for the long haul. He won where he was expected to - his home state of Massachusetts, nearby Vermont and Virginia where his top rivals weren't on the ballot.

    The big question: Who wins Ohio? Romney and Santorum are locked in a tight race. Regardless of the result, we're in for a nomination fight certain to last more weeks if not more months.

    - National Political Editor Liz Sidoti

  • OHIO VOTES SO FAR

    The latest votes in Ohio, with 77 percent of precincts counted:

    • Rick Santorum - 38 percent
    • Mitt Romney - 37 percent
    • Newt Gingrich - 15 percent
    • Ron Paul - 9 percent
  • SUPER FAN ON SUPER TUESDAY

    A Mitt Romney supporter in Massachusetts cheers on the election results.

    Phillip Wallace, a Republican town committee member from Barnstable, Mass., cheers on supporters as election results come in at the Super Tuesday primary watch party for Mitt Romney in Boston, Tuesday, March 6, 2012. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
    by ccarlson on Mar 6, 2012 at 10:45 PM
  • SANTORUM AHEAD BY THIN MARGIN IN OHIO

    With votes tallied in 85 percent of Ohio's precincts, Santorum leads Romney by fewer than 2,000 votes out of more than 1 million cast.
  • A PENNY FOR YOUR... VOTE?

    Caucus attendees in Idaho's Ada County cast their votes
    with coins. The process works like this: Voters wait in line, and when their turn comes they are handed a penny before entering a small booth shielded by a curtain. They drop the coin in a bucket and exit the booth after an official yells "out." It could be a long slog in Ada County, the state's population center. GOP officials estimate more than 9,000 turned out to caucus here and voting is still occurring in Round 1.

    -By John Miller
    Caucusing by penny in Idaho. By Todd Dvorak.
    by tdvorak on Mar 6, 2012 at 11:12 PM via email

  • SANTORUM RALLIES

    Rick Santorum tells cheering supporters in Ohio: "This was a big night tonight. We have won in the West, the Midwest and the South, and we're ready to win across this country."
    Republican presidential candidate, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, right, celebrates with his wife, Karen, at his election night rally Steubenville High School, Tuesday, March 6, 2012, in Steubenville, Ohio. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
    by ccarlson on Mar 6, 2012 at 10:37 PM
    Republican presidential candidate, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum speaks at his election night rally at Steubenville High School, Tuesday, March 6, 2012, in Steubenville, Ohio. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
    by ccarlson on Mar 6, 2012 at 10:36 PM
    Republican presidential candidate, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, left, and his wife, Karen, right, arrive at his election night rally at Steubenville High School, Tuesday, March 6, 2012, in Steubenville, Ohio. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
    by ccarlson on Mar 6, 2012 at 10:37 PM
    Previous
    Next

    1 of 3

  • PROTEST MOMENT

    Protesters sneaked into Mitt Romney rally headquarters in Boston and held up signs. They were quickly escorted from the room by security.
    (AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey)
    by tshaffrey on Mar 6, 2012 at 11:01 PM via email
  • DISPATCH FROM ATLANTA

    Newt Gingrich says the bids to do him in go on and on, AP reporter Sagar Meghani reports.

    By Sagar Meghani
    by smeghani on Mar 6, 2012 at 11:05 PM via email
  • FROM A BUCKEYE AT HEART: An open letter to Ohio

    Dear Ohio,

    You never fail to disappoint.

    Every four years, you can be counted on to be incredibly indecisive about who to support in a presidential election.

    AP National Political Editor Liz Sidoti
    by Jaime Holguin on Mar 6, 2012 at 11:15 PM



    It makes for amazing political theater - and especially long nights for citizens waiting anxiously to find out who will get to compete for the White House, and, in the fall, who will ultimately win it
    What is it about you? Could it be your demographics? Or your geographical make-up? Perhaps, it's both.

    Your conservative stronghold is in the Southwest around Cincinnati. Your liberal bastion is in the Northeast around Cleveland. And your swing voters live everywhere else.

    You are the perfect political mix of rural, urban and suburban. You have a chunk of church-goers - and a chunk of church-abstainers. You have blue-collar union folk, and white-collar professionals. And people of every race.

    And I know you get tired of political professionals saying it: But you are a true microcosm of America. I'm talking to you, Stark County!
    So, on the night of yet another thrilling race, I - as a native of Kent, Ohio, and an alumna of Ohio University - stand with you in spirit as we, your transplanted sons and daughters outside of our beloved Buckeye State, eagerly await the outcome of what we like to call THE Ohio Primary.

    Until November,

    Liz Sidoti
    National Political Editor
    The Associated Press

  • ROMNEY PULLS AHEAD IN OHIO

    With votes tallied in 91 percent of the state's precincts, he leads by about 5,000 votes out of 1.1 million cast.

  • BREAKING: Romney wins Republican presidential caucuses in Idaho

    by Jaime Holguin on Mar 6, 2012 at 6:54 PM
  • ROMNEY WINS MORMON STRONGHOLD

    Mitt Romney has now nailed down the last of the four states where he enjoyed a built-in advantage coming into Super Tuesday.

    Romney, who is Mormon, benefited from Idaho's big Mormon population, about a fourth of the state’s total voters. He also won the state he served as governor, Massachusetts; its neighbor Vermont; and Virginia, where his only competition on the ballot was Ron Paul.

    Meanwhile, the big question still looms: Who will win the super-close matchup in Ohio, the night’s big prize?

    -Connie Cass

  • SUPER TUESDAY SCORECARD

    Who has won what so far:

    Romney: Virginia, Vermont, Massachusetts, Idaho

    Santorum: Tennessee, Oklahoma, North Dakota

    Gingrich: Georgia

  • SCENES FROM WYOMING

    Caucuses in Wyoming are under way, but aren't expected to finish on Super Tuesday. In early voting, two of the five delegates at stake in Wyoming went to Mitt Romney. Voting finishes on Saturday.

    Proceedings don't hold the attention of a young attendee at a Republican county convention in Cheyenne, Wyo., on Super Tuesday. (AP Photo/Mead Gruver)
    by ccarlson on Mar 6, 2012 at 11:26 PM
    Republicans tallied votes on pink slips of paper in Laramie County in southeast Wyoming while the county party chairwoman, Erin Begeman, kept an eye on the county convention. In early voting, two of the five delegates at stake in Wyoming on Super Tuesday went to Mitt Romney. Ron Paul also picked up a delegate. (AP Photo/Mead Gruver)
    by ccarlson on Mar 6, 2012 at 11:27 PM
    Previous
    Next

    1 of 2

  • SUPER TUESDAY: STILL WAITING

    Races yet to be called tonight and the delegates at stake:

    • Ohio primary: 63

    • Alaska caucuses: 24

  • SANTORUM IS BACK

    Santorum's aides say his wins tonight in Oklahoma, Tennessee and North Dakota will provide momentum and money to fuel his underdog campaign. He’s already sent a fundraising e-mail to capitalize on the burst of interest.

    A win in too-close-to-call Ohio would be a capstone to a night that could restore the allure of Santorum as chief anti-Romney in the GOP field and extend the race for weeks, if not months.

    -Philip Elliott

  • BREAKING: Romney wins Republican presidential primary in Ohio

    by Jaime Holguin on Mar 6, 2012 at 6:54 PM
  • SUPER TUESDAY SCORECARD

    Who has won what so far:

    Romney: Ohio, Virginia, Vermont, Massachusetts, Idaho

    Santorum: Tennessee, Oklahoma, North Dakota

    Gingrich: Georgia

  • OHIO, AT LAST

    A late-night squeaker in Ohio has just saved Mitt Romney from an otherwise wimpy Super Tuesday showing.

    Romney and his chief challenger Rick Santorum fought bitterly over the Midwestern swing state that will be central to the general election this fall. It was the big prize of the evening, a chance for one man to prove his chops. Losing Ohio would have left Romney still the favorite to win the nomination, but with little to brag about.

    You can bet he'll be holding his head a little higher Wednesday morning, thanks to Ohio.

    - Connie Cass

  • SUPER TUESDAY: TOP PHOTOS

    A look back at Super Tuesday with top pictures selected by AP photo editors.

     Ron Paul addresses a crowd during the North Dakota caucus in Fargo, N.D. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

     
    Rick Santorum speaks at his election night rally at Steubenville High School in Steubenville, Ohio.  (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
    Mitt Romney smiles as he addresses supporters at his Super Tuesday campaign rally in Boston. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)
    Newt Gingrich shakes hands during a Super Tuesday rally in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
    Previous
    Next

    1 of 4


  • SLIM TUESDAY: ROMNEY'S WINNING MARGIN IN OHIO

    With votes tallied in 99 percent of Ohio's precincts, Romney led by about 12,000 out of 1.1 million cast.

  • SUPER TUESDAY: DELEGATE COUNT

    Here's the latest delegate count by candidate. Remember, they need 1,144 to win the nomination:
    • Romney adds at least 183 delegates, leads with 386.
    • Santorum adds at least 64 and has 156.
    • Gingrich adds at least 52 and has 85.
    • Paul won at least 15 and has 40.
  • ALASKA: STILL OUTSTANDING

    Caucuses are still underway in Alaska. Our editors advise results may not come in for some time.
    Voters cast ballots at the Alaska Republican Party Presidential Preference Poll at Anchorage Christian School in Anchorage, Alaska. (AP Photo/Erik Hill/ Anchorage Daily News)



  • SUPER TUESDAY: TOP PHOTOS

    A look back at Super Tuesday with top pictures selected by AP photo editors.

     Ron Paul addresses a crowd during the North Dakota caucus in Fargo, N.D. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

     
    Rick Santorum speaks at his election night rally at Steubenville High School in Steubenville, Ohio.  (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
    Mitt Romney smiles as he addresses supporters at his Super Tuesday campaign rally in Boston. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)
    Newt Gingrich shakes hands during a Super Tuesday rally in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
    Previous
    Next

    1 of 4


  • DELEGATES STILL TO BE AWARDED

    There were 419 Super Tuesday delegates at stake. About 100 remained to be allocated, and Romney and Santorum appeared in line for many if not most of them. Here's more.
  • AP STREAM: GOODBYE, SUPER TUESDAY

    William House of Huntsville, Ala., waits for Newt Gingrich to arrive during a campaign stop at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center, Tuesday, March 6, 2012, in Huntsville, Ala.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

    Super or not, Tuesday’s over. The race for the Republican presidential nomination is far from its end,  however.

    Mitt Romney, buoyed by his narrow triumph in all-important Ohio, must try to silence his doubters. Rick Santorum will take comfort in how close he came in Ohio and make hay from his victories, especially Oklahoma and Tennessee.

    Newt Gingrich got enough love from Georgia to carry on. And Ron Paul will keep on trucking, whether or not late results from the Alaska caucuses finally give him a win.

    The Super Tuesday Stream is over, but The Associated Press’ campaign coverage continues.

    - Connie Cass


  • Mitt Romney wins the Republican presidential caucuses in Alaska. For full coverage of Super Tuesday click here.
Powered by ScribbleLive Content Marketing Software Platform

AP's labs site allows us to test new reporting ideas. If you have feedback, please reach out to us on the social networks above or email labs-stream@ap.org.